Disadvantages of Foreign Direct Investment in India

Though there are a lot of benefits in a Foreign Direct Investments (FDI), there are still a lot of disadvantages which need attention.

Disadvantages of FDI

Disappearance of cottage and small scale industries:

Some of the products produced in cottage and village industries and also under small scale industries had to disappear from the market due to the onslaught of the products coming from FDIs. Example: Multinational soft drinks.

Contribution to the pollution:

Foreign direct investments contribute to pollution problem in the country. The developed countries have shifted some of their pollution-borne industries to the developing countries. The major victim is automobile industries. Most of these are shifted to developing countries and thus they have escaped pollution.

Exchange crisis:

Foreign Direct Investments are one of the reason for exchange crisis at times. During the year 2000, the Southeast Asian countries experienced currency crisis because of the presence of FDls. With inflation contributed by them, exports have dwindled resulting in heavy fall in the value of domestic currency. As a result of this, the FDIs started withdrawing their capital leading to an exchange crisis. Thus, too much dependence on FDls will create exchange crisis.

Cultural erosion:

In all the countries where the FDls have made an inroad, there has been a cultural shock experienced by the local people, adopting a different culture alien to the country. The domestic culture either disappears or suffers a setback. This is felt in the family structure, social setup and erosion in the value system of the people. Importance given to human relations, hither to suffers a setback with the hi-fi style of living.

Political corruption:

In order to capture the foreign market, the FDIs have gone to the extent of even corrupting the high officials or the political bosses in various countries. Lockheed scandal of Japan is an example. In certain countries, the FDIs influence the political setup for achieving their personal gains. Most of the Latin American countries have experienced such a problem. Example: Drug trafficking, laundering of money, etc.

Inflation in the Economy:

The presence of FDIs has also contributed to the inflation in the country. They spend lot of money on advertisement and on consumer promotion. This is done at the cost of the consumers and the price is increased. They also form cartels to control the market and exploit the consumer. The biggest world cartel, OPEC is an example of FDI exploiting the consumers.

Trade Deficit:

The introduction of TRIPs (Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights) and TRIMs (Trade Related Investment Measures) has restricted the production of certain products in other countries. For example, India cannot manufacture certain medicines without paying royalties to the country which has originally invented the medicine. The same thing applies to seeds which are used in agriculture. Thus, the developing countries are made to either import the products or produce them through FDIs at a higher cost. WTO (World Trade Organization) is in favor of FDIs.

World Bank and lMF Aid:

Some of the developing countries have criticized the World Bank and IMF (International Monetary Fund) in extending assistance. There is a discrimination shown by these international agencies. Only those countries which accommodate FDIs will receive more assistance from these international institutions.

Convertibility of Currency:

FDIs are insisting on total convertibility of currencies in under-developed countries as a prerequisite for investment. This may not be possible in many countries as there may not be sufficient foreign currency reserve to accommodate convertibility. In the absence of such a facility, it is dangerous to allow the FDIs as they may withdraw their investments the moment they find their investments unprofitable.

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